Your Kid’s Not Going Pro

A Youth Sports Blog

You suck (at finding a job), ref!

with 4 comments

This is how bad the economy has gotten. It’s driven otherwise sane people who usually try to avoid getting yelled at by strangers to become youth league referees. From the Canadian Press:

Administrators around the country are reporting an increase in the number of people interested in officiating, especially in areas hit hard by the recession. The job typically won’t make ends meet but it can help: A particularly active referee can earn more than US$10,000 in a year.

Barry Mano, president of the National Association of Sports Officials, has long noticed an inverse relationship between the economy and sports officiating. When more people have free time and are looking for work, it’s easier to find officials.

High school sports organizations in the Rust Belt are reporting a significant uptick. Michigan had just over 13,000 officials last school year, up 1,000 from five years previous. The situation is similar in Ohio and Pennsylvania.

Hank Zaborniak of the Ohio High School Athletic Association says it’s easy to tell which parts of the state are struggling economically. Those are the places with plenty of officials.

“When the steel mills closed down in Youngstown and the manufacturing drops off, we’ll see a spike,” Zaborniak said. “We’ll see more folks from that area of the state enter officiating, and often times it’s because of the additional income, just to help offset what they might have lost.”

2054636125_c12f6d6ab0“You’re fucking blind! And unemployed!”

If I lost my job, I would have to think long and hard about whether getting screamed at by parents and wanna-be Belichicks would be something I would want to do. I’m not sure I love my family that much.

Advertisements

Written by rkcookjr

August 24, 2009 at 11:41 pm

Posted in Sports, U.S.

Tagged with , , ,

4 Responses

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. I’d like to help in following up on some reffing statistics here in SoCal. We play baseball and soccer year-round, as well as the club basketball leagues. Football, at least competitively, is still a Fall sport – with long summer schedules at the high school level. My grandson plays club soccer – he’s nine – and none of the parents, or players, have been red-carded yet. It’s coming though, and it won’t be pleasant. Things get serious in club sports very early, but not pugnaciously so until age eleven or twelve. That 25 bucks a game starts to look meager – even in a bad economy – when thug parents want a piece of your hide. Tom Medlicott

    thomasmedlicott

    August 25, 2009 at 2:18 am

  2. […] handle on how many officials are really quitting, because this recession has created in some areas a boom in the number of people who’ll take that extra $50-75 a night while they try to find, p…. But, no doubt, youth official abuse is one of those problems that’s always been with us (I […]

  3. […] Like climate change, except less potentially fatal and floody, the youth sports officials shortage is something that has been warned about for years, with examples of its devastating effects there if you look, but with action to do something about it slow to come. I posted my first piece about it in 2010, and went back to this well in 2014 (the big idea at the time was waiving child-labor laws to get more teens to serve as officials) and 2015. Actually, I wrote about one solution to this crisis as far back as 2009: massive unemployment in all other sectors of the economy. […]

  4. […] Like climate change, except less potentially fatal and floody, the youth sports officials shortage is something that has been warned about for years, with examples of its devastating effects there if you look, but with action to do something about it slow to come. I posted my first piece about it in 2010, and went back to this well in 2014 (the big idea at the time was waiving child-labor laws to get more teens to serve as officials) and 2015. Actually, I wrote about one solution to this crisis as far back as 2009: massive unemployment in all other sectors of the economy. […]


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: